What NOT to do

In 1985, John’s maternal grandmother and uncle collaborated to make us a one of a kind Christmas gift that has graced our home for more than 30 years: A beautifully hand embroidered picture in a custom made frame.

A close up of the frame. It’s fairly heavy with a craftsman look to it. The employees at the framing place raved about how cool they thought it was.

A close up of the frame. It’s fairly heavy with a craftsman look to it. The employees at the framing place raved about how cool they thought it was.

We were finally ready to hang some more pictures in the new house, but stopped for this one when we noticed some grayish/white spots under the glass at the top.

Uh oh.

I took the whole thing over to the framing place I love and trust 1000 percent. I waited while they carefully took it apart and nearly had a stroke when they uncovered this:

The framer said the spots on the glass may have been acid from the wood.

The framer said the spots on the glass may have been acid from the wood.

No-no #1: The needlework had been mounted to a piece of plywood.

No-no #2: The needlework had been secured to the back of the plywood with heavy duty staples from a staple gun, making their removal slow and tricky to avoid further damage to the fabric.

No-no #3: The excess needlework had been secured to the back of the plywood with masking tape.

Here it is, all restored—back in its original frame, properly mounted and now protected by  conservation glass, which offers UV/light shielding properties:

birds2

There was some concern over whether the frame would be salvageable, and thankfully, it was. In the interim, though, we had told the framer that of the two components, John’s grandmother’s handwork was more important—you can get another frame, but if you lose the needlework, the frame is irrelevant.

birds3

Now that it’s properly framed, I just hope we saved it in time and that no further deterioration will occur. For now, though, we’re so happy it’s back with the family.

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2 Comments

Filed under miscellaneous

2 responses to “What NOT to do

  1. Wow! So glad you managed to save both!

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